Category Archives: Wine writing

Rene Descartes – Won’t Get Fooled Again

Did you know that Rene Descartes’ book “Meditations” is really titled Meditationes de prima philosophia, in qua Dei existentia et animæ immortalitas demonstratur. Translation: Meditations on the First Philosophy: In Which the Existence of God and the Distinction Between Mind and Body are Demonstrated.  That’s the way they rolled back in 1641.

If this blog post was a Medieval book I would probably entitle it :  The Who, Beaujolais Nouveau, and the Relevance of the Song Won’t Get Fooled Again on the Third Thursday of November: How the French Continue to Both Fool Me and Make My Life Better.

Who’s Next.  One of the greatest rock albums of all time – period. People who like this sort of thing are passionate about it aren’t they?  I have a friend [admittedly a bit of a curmudgeon] who has freaked out on people who refer to the song “Teenage Wasteland” on this album.  “The song is called Baba O’Riley! Get it right people”.

My favourite song may be “Won’t Get Fooled Again” – because the premise is of course that we all get fooled again. “Meet the old boss” anyone? “Same as the old boss”.

So I guess I’m willing to get fooled again – we all are.  At least when it comes to Beaujolais Nouveau.  The French have been scamming us [just like Vince Shlomi and the shamwow] and I don’t mind at all.  Selling fresh new wine that has only aged in the time it took them to put the juice in a bottle! Come on. In fact the French have fooled us several times over when it comes to food. Have you ever opened up a Camembert in a car in the summer?  They’re laughing at me while I gag on the gaggiest smell possible.

Next Thursday the Beaujolais Nouveau will be sold at the LCBO.  The “cookie dough” of wine is good enough to get me whipped into a frenzy year after year.  Don’t miss it.

Georges Dubœuf – with your clever little œ in your name – you are the new boss!

The Old Boss

The Old Boss

 


Shipped to Japan

As the anticipation of the release of the 2014 Beaujolais Nouveau whips itself  up into a frenzy at La Maison Oke [“my house” for those of who who prefer not to parlez] it’s nice to know that I’m not alone.

Anyone who has followed my blog [my brother and John from BC] knows that 5 years ago I built PulltheCork on the foundation of  my enthusiasm for Nouveau and my best idea ever – my annual Nouveau party.

Again, it’s not just me who gets excited. Read the following article from the Japan News. Anything the Japanese get excited about has to be good clean fun!

Less than 2 weeks to go!

Nouveau in Japan


Nobody Needs This

I’m sure that the category of “Nobody needs this” is larger than I can imagine – usually because I ignore stupid things.  But last week I saw this in a store. Add one more thing to the list of items you will ignore in a garage sale soon.

 

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Airplane wine

This is a “two hours on the tarmac” story.  Recently my family and I boarded the plane in Madrid and were kept on the ground for over 2 hours before takeoff.  The reason?  While loading the luggage somebody noticed that a screw was missing on a panel. Long story short,  a man in Montreal [Air Canada office] took 2 hours to give permission for an EU maintenance man to put in a screw.

I have several thoughts on this – mostly because I had two hours staring at the loading dock next to me.

1. Why the heck can’t I get a glass of wine while all this is going on?

2. I had time to estimate there must be at least 14000 screws on an airplane minimum

3. There’s no way that was the only screw missing and the chance that screw was a safety hazard?  Come on.

4. I asked my kids how many screws they thought were in  a plane like this. “One less than there should have been” was their reply. Kids don’t care. They just sit there and watch Spiderman. Twice!

Now if by “screw” they meant “engine number 2″ then my apologies Air Canada.

Scruffy Scruffington, where were you when I needed you?

Scruffy


Hanging on

There really is no effective way to come to terms with the end of a vacation.

The most one can hope for is to prolong it a little with some photos, conversations, or memories.

I think we all feel this way. Recently a columnist in the Guelph Mercury wrote about holding onto his vacation beard for at least a week after vacation. But I didn’t grow a vacation beard – it would have been far too scratchy for my wife’s comfort and far to grey for my own.

But what about a taste memory. I’ve read that taste and smell are the strongest memories.

Earlier in the summer I posted this photo of me enjoying a bière in my jardin in France.

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Yesterday  I found 1664 Blanc here in Canada, bought one, and then opened it up in my own kitchen [in front of my French copper pots just to add some je ne sais quoi – or terroir as the French have it].  That should help prolong my vacation.

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Local Produce

Wherever you are there you will be. So if you be there then you should eat whatever is local.
When in the Costa del Sol in Spain nothing is more local than seafood paella with a chilled Rioja. If you’re not chilling your red wine in the summer then you need to start.
These be some photos of the paella I made Saturday night with tiny clams, Galatia mussels, calamari, and shrimp.

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Café Culture

If there is one thing that I could import from Europe if would be the café culture. If you can believe it, what’s happening in this photo is illegal in my country.

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Why is it illegal – because it’s 8:45 am and I’m the only one drinking coffee. And before you judge, none of these men are getting “loaded”, they are meeting in a café for a small glass of wine and a beer. Yes, a morning verre de vin blanc et une petite pression of Heinekin. They were also hilarious [at least my limited French vocab thought they were]. In fact, I think the reason that I’m sitting alone at this table is because I’m the only guy drinking coffee. Although as my friend Rob notes, one of the men may be giving a “thumbs u to the Canadian for drinking coffee this late in the day”.

I asked brother-in-spain why we didn’t have places in North America that served half pints and small glasses of wine for 2euro – and he pointed out that if there was a place serving $2 beer then we probably wouldn’t want to sit there because it would be full of people trying to get “loaded” for cheap.

I’m not saying I need a beer or a glass of wine in the morning [I actually don’t need or want one] but it’s clear that there is a big cultural gap – café cultural.


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