Wine study keeps Science Relevant

As a teacher I am always looking for ways to keep Geography, Physics, and now Science relevant to the masses.  Consider this excerpt from an article in Science Daily.  “As strange as it sounds, a new research study published in the FASEB Journal, suggests that the “healthy” ingredient in red wine, resveratrol, may prevent the negative effects that spaceflight and sedentary lifestyles have on people.”

I have several thoughts on the matter.

1. I have been searching for ways to counteract the negative effects of spaceflight for weeks now and never thought of Red Wine as a possible solution.

2. I can’t believe that resveratrol is spelled correctly

3. I can’t believe that there is enough “science stuff” to warrant a Science Daily.

4. Some weeks I get three Canadian Tire flyers and offers for 8 credit cards in the mail and I can’t believe I’ve never received an offer to subscribe to Science Daily.

The full article is copied here.

Red Wine: Exercise in a Bottle?

ScienceDaily (July 3, 2011) — As strange as it sounds, a new research study published in the FASEB Journal, suggests that the “healthy” ingredient in red wine, resveratrol, may prevent the negative effects that spaceflight and sedentary lifestyles have on people. The report describes experiments in rats that simulated the weightlessness of spaceflight, during which the group fed resveratrol did not develop insulin resistance or a loss of bone mineral density, as did those who were not fed resveratrol.

According to Gerald Weissmann, M.D., Editor-in-Chief of the FASEB Journal, “There are overwhelming data showing that the human body needs physical activity, but for some of us, getting that activity isn’t easy. A low gravity environment makes it nearly impossible for astronauts. For the earthbound, barriers to physical activity are equally challenging, whether they be disease, injury, or a desk job. Resveratrol may not be a substitute for exercise, but it could slow deterioration until someone can get moving again.”

Scientists studied rats that underwent simulated weightlessness by hindlimb tail suspension and were given a daily oral load of resveratrol. The control group showed a decrease in soleus muscle mass and strength, the development of insulin resistance, and a loss of bone mineral density and resistance to breakage. The group receiving resveratrol showed none of these complications. Study results further demonstrated some of the underlying mechanisms by which resveratrol acts to prevent the wasting adaptations to disuse-induced mechanical unloading. This study also suggests that resveratrol may be able to prevent the deleterious consequences of sedentary behaviors in humans.

“If resveratrol supplements are not your cup of tea,” Weissmann added, “then there’s good news. You can find it naturally in red wine, making it the toast of the Milky Way.”

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About Travis Oke

Wine writer / consultant View all posts by Travis Oke

2 responses to “Wine study keeps Science Relevant

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