Tag Archives: Beaujolais

Decision Time

This summer I plan to make no decisions – and to renew that vow daily.  So I’ll let others make them for me – lessening the weight of responsibility that i might otherwise feel when it’s summertime and the living’s supposed to be easy.

Decisions like which wine to open.

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Fortunately I prepare for such life altering occasions by keeping a light red, and full-bodied rosé [or rosado in this case] and a crisp white in the fridge. So that when the wife gets home [don’t worry “Mad Max fans”  I asked her permission to call her “the wife” this one time so don’t go all Furiosa on me] she has an easy choice. Because really it’s a win-win-win decision [and no M I don’t mean open all three].

She chose.

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And she wins.

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The Red … Georges Duboeuf Beaujolais $11 on sale—LCBO#: 212480   |   Light, berries, cherry, easy drinking … please serve chilled.

The Pink … Muga Rose $14 —VINTAGES#: 603795   |   Seriously, i get zero kickback from the people at Muga … i just love this wine so much and it’s a better choice than those suckers who are drinking water.

The White …Marques de Riscal White, Rueda  $12 —LCBO#: 36822   |   Crisp, acidic, medium body, I say it tastes like rhubard, my wife says Lychee – I admit lychee sounds far cooler.


Nouveau on the way

The Beaujolais Nouveau is on its way and I have a bit of a sneak preview. Well at least I’m training my palate for a preview. At the very least it’s the same grape as Nouveau.

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The fine folks at Chateau des Charmes in Niagara deliver this tasty Gamay 52 weeks a year. Coming soon to a store near you [if you love in Ontario] will be their “Nouveau” Gamay #jesuisarrivé13 – by far the cleverest marketing name for a wine I’ve ever seen.
Thanks Bosc family – and thanks or not naming your nouveau after a cute small animal.

CH DES CHARMES GAMAY NOIR VQA
LCBO 57349 | Price $ 12.95


Restocking at the LCBO

My top shelf is empty.  For those who follow this blog you will recall that the top shelf is the vin ordinaire – the wine that my wife can open without asking “is this saved for something special?”.

So a restocking is in order.  Here’s what I came up with – 8 bottles for $90. They are the wines that are good and inexpensive too.

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  1. France – GEORGES DUBOEUF BEAUJOLAIS  LCBO 212480 |Price $ 10.95
  2. Pelee Island – PELEE ISLAND BACO NOIR VQA LCBO 485128 | Price $ 10.45
  3. Spain – BODEGAS CASTANO HECULA  LCBO 300673 | Price $ 11.80
  4. Niagara – CHATEAU DES CHARMES ALIGOTE VQA ST. DAVID’S BENCH  LCBO 296848 |Price $ 13.95
  5. Italy MEZZOMONDO NEGROAMARO SALENTO IGT LCBO 588962 |Price $ 9.00
  6. Spain [Cava} – CODORNIU BRUT CLASICO SPARKLING LCBO 215814 | Price $ 12.95
  7. Portugal – BERCO DO INFANTE RESERVA LCBO 253864 |Price $ 9.20
  8. Niagara – CALAMUS RIESLING 2010 VINTAGES 158642 | Price $ 16.95 [I spend big $$ on this one because my man Orest vouched for it]

Frost Rail

Frost usually makes me mad at this time of year. The novelty of scraping off my car again is gone. Come on morning sun, stop making me do the work for you!

However, there is a rail of frost at the OX Guelph bar that is guaranteed to make even the most miserable winter hater happy. The frost rail system creates a crisp, dry layer of frost on the top of the bar. It looks a little like a curling rink – and it certainly makes more sense than curling. Besides being wickedly cool looking there are many other advantages …

  1. Keeps the last gulp of your pint cold
  2. A little ice rail all summer feels like you’re thumbing your nose at nature – and who doesn’t want in on that?
  3. You can also keep your Beaujolais, or Ontario Gamay, down to temperature by serving it in a flat bottom tumbler (clever girl – you know who you are)
  4. The ice rail bar is like one of the Seven Wonders so you can claim a “pilgrimage” to the bar at least once this summer

Ask your bartender to “brand” the ice rail for you – very cool OX guys, very cool.

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A Vacuum of Information

First of all, how cool is the word vacuum?  If there’s a better word with consecutive u’s in it then I don’t know it.

Secondly, how come I can’t find any information on the most important wine event of the season – BEAUJOLAIS NOUVEAU? I can’t get a list from the LCBO (even though I have a reliable inside source) and hardly anybody even discusses it on the interweb.  It certainly is not garnering the attention it deserves.

I think that I am one of the few that champions the event.  So what is it? Well apparently if I tell you I break one of the rules about wine blogging. Three years ago when I was researching how to write a wine blog (yes I did that) the overwhelming cardinal sin was to explain Beaujolais Nouveau.  NUTS TO THEM.

Read about it here in Wine Weekly (I didn’t just invent that). About the only question it doesn’t answer is “Who drinks Nouveau?” Answer – I do.


Label me a Nouveau Freak

Hey Art historians – here’s some real art for the Nouveau lover.  A brief history of Nouveau from Georges Dubœuf.

2003 - Our first party in Guelph

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010


Road Trip? The Geography of French Wine

Reims to Rhone - the perfect iTrip

I am planning early for retirement.  Champagne to Chateauneuf – that’s my first road trip!  And I do believe that despite what my iPhone says, it will take more than 6 hours and 25 minutes. Here are the details …

The only thing I’ll need is a convertible as I already have a good-looking wife for the passenger seat (an essential part of retirement).

From the bubbles of Champagne to the Pinot Noirs of Burgundy I promise only to take country roads. 

On to Beaujolais (which although technically part of Burgundy serves up Gamay grapes) where I can track down Georges Dubœuf and ask him why he connects his “o” and “e”. 

Lyon is the most northern point of the Rhone and the gastronomic capital of the world. I am a gastronimic fan.  We will stop for dinner. 

The Northern Rhone Syrah wines inspired the Shiraz movement all over the world.  It’s a good stopover before I get to my favorite French wine region – the Southern Rhone –   where wines are made with a blend of as many as 13 grapes.

This trip needs some careful planning.  Some further research is forthcoming as there is much to look forward to.


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